Maine starts $60M workforce push to reverse stark economic trends

Maine starts $60M workforce push to reverse stark economic trends

Mills said the effort will help keep Maine competitive and “craft a new, more diverse economy that draws in companies and empowers everybody to make an excellent living.”

The Maine Neighborhood College System will spearhead a $60 million, four-year effort intended at training and informing employees to reverse plain demographic trends and labor shortages holding back the states economy.

A brand-new virtual center, the Harold Alfond Center for the Advancement of Maines Workforce, will be produced to lead the effort, the system revealed Tuesday. The job will be moneyed by $35 million in federal stimulus money being administered by the state, $15.5 million from the Harold Alfond Foundation and the rest from the personal sector and other grants.

The new center will pull together various current labor force training efforts into one system that will offer short-term training and longer-term degrees or certifications. It will focus on abilities inequalities, a low post-secondary education rate in Maine, the aging and shrinking workforce and the requirement to make education and training more available at work, online and within neighborhoods. The job, which will roll out through the end of this year, will focus around Maine Quality Centers, a short-term training arm of the community college system that plans to use discounted or complimentary short-term training to more than 13,000 people. The head of the centers, Dan Belyea, also will coordinate new training efforts.The state cash from the recovery effort will be focused on training 8,500 individuals for the health care, green economy, trades, hospitality, manufacturing, education and computer system technology fields.

The new center will gather various present workforce training efforts into one system that will offer short-term training and longer-term degrees or certifications. It likewise aims to be a training department for little- to medium-sized companies who do not have their own training departments. It will focus on abilities mismatches, a low post-secondary education rate in Maine, the aging and diminishing workforce and the requirement to make education and training more available at work, online and within neighborhoods.” Were bringing new education tools to fulfill immediate company needs at an accelerated rate,” David Daigler, president of the Maine Community College System, said.


” Businesses acknowledge that if they dont have a certified labor force, they dont have a service or product they can provide,” Daigler said.More articles from the BDN
This material was initially released here.

The necessary food and accommodations industry is not likely to reach previous employment levels provided its demographics and ongoing competition for workers from other sectors, according to HospitalityMaine, an industry group that revealed its own more focused five-year workforce training strategy last month. A Maine Department of Labor study launched last month discovered that task seekers throughout numerous professions are having a bumpy ride rejoining the labor force due to the fact that their skills do not match employment opportunities.

Maines status as the nations oldest state by average age has long been one of the biggest difficulties dealing with services and policymakers. When Gov. Janet Mills revealed a 10-year financial plan in 2019, she set a goal of growing the labor force by 75,000 even as projections revealed it would contract by 65,000 over that time duration as older employees retired.The pandemic has actually agitated things further. Maine lost 22,800 jobs during the pandemic from February 2020 through August 2021, according to the Maine Department of Labor. The hospitality industry alone lost about half of those. After the state lifted constraints, numerous facilities saw business go back to or perhaps surpass pre-pandemic levels this summertime, however employee scarcities continue to restrict activities.

The 2nd phase will aim to teach new skills to non-managerial employees in occupations consisting of medical transcription, consumer assistance, info innovation assistance, administrative assistant positions and monetary services. By 2024, about 65 percent of Maines workforce is anticipated to need a credential to work, up from 44 percent today.

The task, which will roll out through the end of this year, will focus around Maine Quality Centers, a short-term training arm of the community college system that plans to provide totally free or reduced short-term training to more than 13,000 people. The head of the centers, Dan Belyea, likewise will coordinate new training efforts.The state cash from the recovery effort will be focused on training 8,500 individuals for the health care, green economy, trades, hospitality, education, computer and production innovation fields.


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